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Aprilia RSV4 Review

Aprilia RSV4 Review

A V4-powered sportbike is a bit of a niche offering, but in the minds of many, what could be better? Aprilia unveiled the RSV4, their new flagship model in February of 2008. The RSV4 comes in three variations: the base R model, the Factory model with Ohlins suspension, and a customer-specified Max Biaggi Replica. Aprilia also produced the Tuono, a more standard version of the V4 which is much the same but more handlebar-equipped, rather than lowered grips, and with a less powerful engine.

The Aprilia RSV4 engine was developed specifically for racing and has been extremely successful for the Italian brand. In its inaugural World Superbike Championship in 2009 the RSV4 saw nine podium finishes. Speaking of Biaggi, success would continue in 2010 and 2012 when Max would win the World Superbike Championship. Most recently, the RSV4 also won the World Superbike Championship in 2014.

The RSV4 (as well as the Tuono) are assisted by a number of electronic aids known as APRC, or Aprilia Performance Ride Control.  These include traction control, wheelie control, launch control, quick shift, and a multi-map V4 engine management system designed to cater to both on road and professional race riders. ABS comes standard on the RSV4 and Tuono.

Aprilia RSV4

Real World Numbers

The RSV4 was thoroughly reviewed in the June 2010 issue of Motorcycle Consumer News which published the following numbers:

Rear-Wheel HP 152.77
Rear-Wheel TQ (lb.-ft.) 73.08
Wet Weight 458.5
Average MPG 26.7
Top Speed 177.7
0–60 mph, sec. 3.07
0–100 mph, sec. 5.75
0–1/4 mile, sec. 10.16
0–1/4 mile, mph 142.75
Braking 60–0 mph (feet) 123.6
Power to Weight 01:03.1

 

Price / MSRP

A little browsing found these MSRPs for Canada and the United States:

RSV4 R: $15,995 CAD / $15,499 USD
RSV4 Factory: $20,795 CAD / $20,499 USD

Competition

Motorcyclists tempted by the Aprilia RSV4 may also be interested in:

BMW S1000RR
MV Agusta F4

Full Specifications

From Bikez.com, with some additions/adjustments:

 
Engine and transmission
Displacement: 999.60 ccm (61.00 cubic inches)
Engine type: V4, four-stroke
Engine details: Longitudinal 65° V-4 cylinder
Power: 184.00 HP (134.3 kW) @ 12500 RPM
Torque: 117.00 Nm (11.9 kgf-m or 86.3 ft.lbs) @ 10000 RPM
Compression: 13.0:1
Bore x stroke: 78.0 x 52.3 mm (3.1 x 2.1 inches)
Valves per cylinder: 4
Fuel system: Injection. Airbox with front dynamic air intakes. 4 Weber-Marelli 48-mm throttle bodies with 8 injectors and latest generation Ride-by-Wire engine management. Choice of three different engine maps selectable by the rider with bike in motion: T (Track), S (Sport), or R (Road).
Fuel control: DOHC
Ignition: Magneti Marelli digital electronic ignition system integrated in engine control system, with one spark plug per cylinder and stick-coil-type coils
Lubrication system: Wet sump lubrication system with oil radiator and two oil pumps (lubrication and cooling)
Cooling system: Liquid
Gearbox: 6-speed
Transmission type,
final drive:
Chain
Clutch: Multiplate wet clutch with mechanical slipper system
Driveline: Primary drive: Straight cut gears and integrated flexible coupling, drive ratio: 73/44 (1,659). Final drive: Chain: Drive ratio: 40/16 (2.5) or 42/16 (2.625)
Exhaust system: 4 into 2 into 1 layout, single oxygen sensor, lateral single silencer with engine control unit-controlled butterfly valve and integrated trivalent catalytic converter (Euro 3)
 
Chassis, suspension, brakes and wheels
Frame type: Aluminium dual beam chassis with pressed and cast sheet elements. Sachs steering damper
Rake (fork angle): 24.5°
Trail: 105 mm (4.1 inches)
Front suspension: Upside-down Showa fork with 43 mm stanchions. Forged aluminium radial calliper mounting brackets. Completely adjustable spring preload and hydraulic compression and rebound damping. Wheel travel: 120 mm
Front suspensiontravel: 120 mm (4.7 inches)
Rear suspension: Twin sided aluminium swingarm; mixed low thickness and sheet casting technology. Sachs piggy back monoshock with completely adjustable: spring preload, wheelbase, hydraulic compression and rebound damping. APS progressive linkage.
Rear suspensiontravel: 130 mm (5.1 inches)
Front tyre: 120/70-17
Rear tyre: 190/55-17
Front brakes: Double disc. ABS. Floating stainless steel disc with lightweight stainless steel rotor and aluminium flange with 6 pins
Front brakes diameter: 320 mm (12.6 inches)
Rear brakes: Single disc. ABS. Brembo calliper with two Ø 32 mm separate pistons
Rear brakes diameter: 220 mm (8.7 inches)
Wheels: Front: Aluminium alloy with 6 split spokes, 3.5”X17” Rear: Aluminium alloy with 5 split spokes, 6”X17”
 
Physical measures and capacities
Dry weight: 186.0 kg (410.1 pounds)
Power/weight ratio: 0.9892 HP/kg
Seat height: 845 mm (33.3 inches) If adjustable, lowest setting.
Overall length: 2,040 mm (80.3 inches)
Ground clearance: 130 mm (5.1 inches)
Wheelbase: 1,420 mm (55.9 inches)
Fuel capacity: 17.00 litres (4.49 gallons)
Reserve fuel capacity: 4.00 litres (1.06 gallons)
 
Other specifications
Starter: Electric
Electrical: Flywheel mounted 420W alternator with rare earth magnets
Factory warranty: 2-year unlimited-mileage warranty
Color options: Black, Red

 

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