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How to Pull a Motorcycle Trailer – Tips from a Veteran

Our readers are some of the awesomest motorcyclists out there. Karl Steinmeyer from Get Lost Trailers is one of them. Karl’s a custom motorcycle trailer builder, and a do-good’er motorcyclist too. Not only did he put together the 50 gallon whiskey barrel motorcycle trailer, he also wrote out and freely shares the plans for making your own motorcycle trailer on bikerMetric.

One Wheel Motorcycle TrailerHow to Pull a Motorcycle Trailer – Tips from a Veteran:

“I’ve enjoyed more of the open road with a trailer, than without. Take it from me, it will change the way you ride.

1. Ride it like you stole it, just not when pulling a trailer.
2. Pull in – pull out parking spots are your friend.
3. Locks are not for pussies; lock your trailer to your bike, and your trailer shut.
4. Push starting is a bitch, don’t leave your trailer lights on.
5. Ride more; bring what you want, when you want.”

Karl Steinmeyer
Get Lost Trailers

About Karl Steinmeyer

Our readers are some of the awesomest motorcyclists out there. Karl Steinmeyer from The USA Trailer Store is one of them. Karl's a custom motorcycle trailer builder, and a do-good'er motorcyclist too. He put together the 50 gallon whiskey barrel motorcycle trailer, shared the plans for making your own motorcycle trailer freely on bikerMetric, and wrote us his best motorcycle trailering tips.

3 comments

  1. David Plowright

    I have ridden over 30,000 miles pulling a trailer, both in North America and just about every country in Europe, including a trip well north of the Arctic Circle in Norway. While Karl’s tips are good I expected to read and learn more. His best point was to look for pull-through parking spots as it can be very difficult to reverse a trailer even with a reverse drive as on my BMW. Turning the bike and trailer around also takes more space so be careful not to miss a turn especially when on narrow roads. He says “to ride it like you stole it” which is largely true particularly if you have a trailer with good suspension. Most of the time you won’t realize the trailer is there until you try to come to a stop. When towing a loaded trailer, and usually two up, allow additional stopping distance as you will need it. When quick passing is needed you will probably do best by dropping down a gear to get you by those other vehicles. Also your gear box is very useful when coming down winding mountain roads where you can use it for breaking effect. This will save your brakes and help you stop more quickly.

    An excellent book, The Essential Guide to Motorcycle Travel by Dale Coyner has a chapter on trailer use. He also sells great trailers from his company Open Road Outfitters. Note: I have no commercial connection to him other than buying my trailer from him.

    A trailer definitely expands what you can carry and I recommend them highly-

  2. RT @YouMotorcycle: How to Pull a Motorcycle Trailer – Tips from a Veteran @karlsteinmeyer https://t.co/M9fOwzf0t0 https://t.co/IxidskWVGa

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