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Sitting on a sunny patch of grass we saw her, in her highlighter pink gear. She climbed off after parking awkwardly. Her gear and her bike looked like they were either impeccably well kept, or hadn’t seen much road. I looked back to our helmets and bikes. They were stained, scratched and splattered. They were seasoned vets. Even my ex’s gear showed all the wear of many happy roads together. Their beauty was in their miles, not in their parking lot grassy hillside appeal.

My ex rolled her eyes as the girl left her bike. “I hate pink,” she declared.

As a female motorcyclist, what does pink gear mean to you?



I decided to do a little survey of some of my female motorcyclist blogging friends from across the world. The question was: "As a female motorcyclist, what does pink gear mean to you?". The results were as diverse as the women who wrote in.

Pink Motorcycle Gear

Pink Motorcycle GearSitting on a sunny patch of grass we saw her, in her highlighter pink gear. She climbed off after parking awkwardly. Her gear and her bike looked like they were either impeccably well kept, or hadn’t seen much road. I looked back to our helmets and bikes. They were stained, scratched and splattered. They were seasoned vets. Even my ex’s gear showed all the wear of many happy roads together. Their beauty was in their miles, not in their parking lot grassy hillside appeal.

My ex rolled her eyes as the girl left her bike. “I hate pink,” she declared.

As a female motorcyclist, what does pink gear mean to you?

I decided to do a little survey of some of my female motorcyclist blogging friends from across the world. The question was: “As a female motorcyclist, what does pink gear mean to you?”. The results were as diverse as the women who wrote in.

I-Want-To-Ride.com Cecilia
Two Wheel Claim to Fame: Commuting in Italy & Canada, I-Want-To-Ride

“Pink gear to me symbolizes breast cancer awareness. Full stop.
The only time I would ever wear pink gear is during a breast cancer fundraiser ride. I would deck myself out from head to toe to support the cause!

Other than that, I find pink to be too girly and in your face that there’s a female rider on the really cool motorcycle. Instead, I prefer to be noticed for my riding skills, regardless of gender.”

Princess Scooterpie Darlene
Two Wheel Claim to Fame: Scooterista & Motociclista, Princess Scooterpie

“I liked pink gear in the beginning, because it was the only gear that looked feminine. I was physically harrassed once and quickly changed my mind about pink.

Manufacturers need to think more sophisticated now when it comes to gear because we want vibrant colors and not just men’s gear in pink material, we are looking for fit and finish with our gear.

Pink is ok, but there are times when you definitely don’t want to look like a girl out on the road all alone on your bike. I think it makes you a target at times for aggressive drivers & sometime disrespected because you are a woman in pink on a bike. I had pink gear for about 10 months. A lot of it came down to lack of choice when I purchased it.”

Mistress Bate on Twitter Mistress
Two Wheel Claim to Fame: 4,000+ Tweets about bikes, sex, and dogs, @MSCHVS2

“One of my bikes is pink (blending into orange). Pink is a power color for me. Not light fluffy pink, but bold, in-your-face fushia.I have pink gloves, to match, but that’s it. Girly pink is for passengers. I am strong, feminine and soft, but I can leave a mark.

Give me bold, bright, beautiful – a reflection who I am!”

Anna Anna
Two Wheel Claim to Fame: Freeranging around the world, Freeranging

“I do not own one piece of gear that’s pink and I would never in a million years spend money on motorcycle gear that has even just one pink spot. While motorcycle gear is 90% function and only 10% fashion, I admit that I do care about how I am perceived by others and pink would certainly create the wrong impression. To me, nothing screams “I am a girl, please treat me like one” like the color pink.

Yes, I am a girl, but when it comes to motorcycling, I want to be treated like a biker, not like a girl. Because let’s face it, being treated like a girl means not being taken seriously by the majority of bikers when it comes to wrench-turning and knee-dragging. I’m not saying that I want to hide the fact that I am a girl (I LOVE being a girl) – there’s no way of hiding it anyway, even in full gear, because my long hair sticks out from under the helmet. But when I’m with my bike, I am a biker first, an amateur mechanic second, and a girl third (actually, in the motorcycle world, I find my gender to be completely irrelevant). If I am being noticed at all, I want to be noticed for my CB600F’s unique Streetfighter-look (home-built, thankyouverymuch :) ), for my riding skills, for the adventurous trips I take, and for my extensive motorcycle knowledge – since these are the things that I am proud of and that make me who I want to be. Pink does not!

Having said that, I do not judge anybody for choosing to wear pink. The important thing is to be who you want to be.”

highwaylass Highwaylass
Two Wheel Claim to Fame: Writing and riding, Transport of Delight

“It makes me want to be violently sick.”

 

 

Rachel Rachel
Two Wheel Claim to Fame: Girly motorcycle super-blogger, Fuzzygalore

“As a motorcyclist, pink gear means everything and nothing to me. It’s all about choice. The idea that one size, color, gender fits all is going by the wayside. I think that the presence of pink motorcycle gear signals a much welcomed shift on the part of gear manufacturers to attempt to cater to a fast growing segment of the marketplace. They are trying to cater to what they think lady riders want and actually making quality gear tailored to the feminine form. But as anyone who has more than one lady in their life knows – it is impossible to know “what women want.” That is as varied and unique as a handful of snowflakes. Some women feel proud and excited to wave their “I’m a girl on a motorcycle” flag – which I think pink gear does whether that is the riders conscious intention or not.


Then of course there are some women motorcyclists who just like to move around less conspicuously. Maybe for some the pink signals some type of societal gender role that they just don’t subscribe to? Or… maybe some ladies just hate pink.

No one can speak for all women and their wants.

On a personal level, pink happens to be my favorite color. That being said, I don’t foresee myself buying any pink gear in the near future. I suppose if a particular item really appealed to me and just happened to be pink – sure, why not? But, I don’t seek it out.

There is something satisfying about having the option to choose to go pink …or not.”

adri Adrian S.
Two Wheel Claim to Fame: Great motorcycle site despite not being a woman, YouMotorcycle

Thank you so much to everyone who sent in their opinions. You ladies are first class motorcyclists that I always take time to check in on, no matter how busy my week. I’m sure there are a few of you who could probably ride circles around me or spin a wrench faster than I can. Hats off to you, ladies. Keep up the great riding and the great work on your sites!

About YouMotorcycle

YouMotorcycle is a lifestyle motorcycle blog to be appreciated by those who see motorcycling as a lifestyle and not simply a hobby, sport, or method of transportation. Most of the posts on the site are written by past and present motorcycle industry staff. We remain fiercely independent, innovative, and unconventional. Our goal is to encourage more people to enjoy the world's greatest outdoor sport by helping new riders get started and inspiring current riders to get out more. We motorcycle, do You?

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